How Many Electric Cars Catch Fire Every Year?

According to our data calculation from data analysis by AutoinsuranceEZ from the NTSB and data from the International Energy Agency (IEA), there are estimated to be 4125 electric cars catching fire each year.

Data Last Checked: June, 2023

Electric cars are becoming more and more popular, but there is one big concern that people have about them: fire.

How many electric cars catch fire each year? Do they pose a danger to drivers and passengers? Recently, there have been several reports of electric cars catching on fire. So far, it seems that this is a rare occurrence, but it’s still something that needs to be addressed.

Let’s take a closer look at the data and find out what it tells us about the safety of electric cars.

Key Electric Car Fire Statistics

  • Electric-powered vehicles have the least risk of catching fire according to data from NTSB.
  • Hybrid-powered vehicles are at the highest risk of catching fire.
  • Battery-electric vehicles are only .03% likely to ignite, compared to 1.5% for gas-powered vehicles and 3.4% for hybrid vehicles.
  • During 2018, vehicle fires caused $1.9 billion in direct property damage in the US.
TypeFires (per 100K vehicle)Total Fire 
1. Hybrid3474.516,051
2.Gas1529.9199,533
3.Electric 25.152

This information comes from the latest data on car fires from the NTSB and was calculated by taking vehicle sales data from the BTS. This data are based on sample.

Car Fire Statistics By Brand (3 year data)

Rank MakeFatal Crashes
1FORD21,262
2CHEVROLET20,435
3TOYOTA12,918
4HONDA10,969
5DODGE7,983
6NISSIAN7,956
7GMC4,533
8JEEP4,138
9HYUNDAI3,766
10KIA2,834
Source: nhtsa, iihs, goodcarbadcar

Total Number of reported highway vehicle fires 1980 to 2020

YearsNumber of highway vehicle fires in thousands
2020173
2019189.5
2018181.5
2017168
2016173
2015174
2014167.5
2013164
2012172.5
2011187.5
2010184.5
2009190.5
2008207
2007227.5
2006250
2005259
2004266.5
2003286
2002307
2001327
2000325
1999345
1998358.5
1997377
1996395
1995386
1994402
1993402
1992385.5
1991406.5
1990415
1989415
1988459
1987451
1986438
1985437
1984437
1983435
1982433
1981453
1980456

Which Cars Catch On Fire The Most

Which Cars Catch On Fire The Most

Plug-in hybrids and hybrid-electric vehicles catch on fire the most because of the high voltage battery packs they contain. Lithium ion batteries are known to be volatile and can easily ignite if damaged or overheated. A number of fires have been reported in these types of vehicles, and it’s something that manufacturers are working hard to address.

How Many Cars Catch Fire Every Year

How Many Cars Catch Fire Every Year

On average, 213,000 cars catch fire every year in the United States. This averages out to about 600 car fires per day. The vast majority of these – around 190,000 – are sparked by mechanical or electrical problems, while the rest are started by accidents or arson.

Electric Car Catches Fire While Charging

Electric Car Catches Fire While Charging

Based on our study, estimated 3-5 electric cars catch fire while charging in the period 2019-2022.  It’s important to note that millions of electric cars are on the road today and only a very small percentage have caught fire.

According to the latest statistics on electric cars catching fire, there are 52 reported fires in 2020.

Can Electric Cars Catch Fire While Charging

Yes, electric cars can catch fire while charging.

It’s important to have a basic understanding of how electric cars work and why they need to be charged to understand this situation.

Electric cars are powered by an electric motor, which is powered by a battery pack. The battery pack is charged using an outlet that is connected to your home’s electrical system.

If the car battery pack is damaged or defective, it can catch fire while charging. This happens because of the way in which the battery pack is designed and constructed.

The battery pack consists of many smaller cells that are wired together in series to produce voltage for the electric motor and other components within the car. These cells can short circuit when damaged or defective, causing them to overheat and catch fire as a result of this short circuit condition.

It’s important for drivers who own electric vehicles to never leave their vehicles unattended while charging them at home or elsewhere (such as at a public charging station).

Source

1.https://www.ntsb.gov/safety/safety-studies/Documents/SR2001.pdf

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